Starting on Thursday, May 8 and continuing throughout the weekend, Las Vegas will have nothing on the Big Apple.

With apologies to “Guys and Dolls,” 32 high rollers will gather and hold the world’s second oldest established permanent floating craps game in New York.

It’s time for another NFL Draft.

The interviews are over. The combine is history. The Wonderlic scores are in. The mock drafts are (mercifully) shoved aside.

It’s time to roll the dice.

Entire futures of franchises are at stake. Coaches’ fates are in the hands of the players whose names will be read by the Commissioner. Fans are on the edge of their seats.

Luck, be a lady.

The terrific irony of all the preparation, speculation, mock drafts and scuttlebutt over which player will go to which team is…that all of it really doesn’t matter.

You can’t count cards at the NFL Draft. The house usually wins. Things often don’t go as planned.

Luck can be a blessing or a curse.

The NFL Draft is full of cases of “What if?”

The Lions, like so many teams, know that as well as anybody.

In 1960 a group of eight men called themselves The Foolish Club.

They were the original owners of the teams of the American Football League. They would challenge the mighty NFL, both on the field and in the courts. It didn’t take long before the AFL began challenging the NFL on draft day.

Four players who would become stars in the new league—in some cases, Pro Football Hall of Fame members—could have been Detroit Lions.

Should have been, really.

The Lions didn’t draft poorly in the ‘60s—they just didn’t have the best of luck, or the deepest of pockets.

The decade’s drafts would eventually bring star players such as Mel Farr, Charlie Sanders, Lem Barney and Greg Landry to Detroit. But there could have been so much more.

The fledgling AFL screwed up the Lions’ plans.

It started in 1960—the AFL’s first year in existence.

Johnny Robinson was a gem of a player from Louisiana State University. He played in the backfield on both sides of the football—a stupendous defender in the secondary and a nifty ball carrier as a halfback on offense.

So heralded was Robinson in college that the Lions snapped him up as the third overall pick of the 1960 Draft.

But the Foolish Club liked Robinson, too. The Dallas Texans drafted Robinson as well.

The Lions of the established NFL and the Texans of the Foolish Club engaged in one of the first bidding wars between the two leagues.

The Foolish Club won. Robinson went to the Texans, who would become the Kansas City Chiefs.

Johnny Robinson played for the Texans/Chiefs for 12 years. He made nine All-Pro teams. He intercepted 57 passes as a safety in the AFL and NFL. Such was his impact that when Robinson intercepted a pass, the Chiefs’ record was 35-1-1.

Robinson is in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He is a member of the AFL’s All-Time team. He is considered by many to be one of the top five defensive backs in pro football history.

And the Lions lost him to the Foolish Club, in the AFL’s maiden year.

John Hadl was a multi-dimensional player from Kansas who played halfback and quarterback—and with such aplomb that the school named him as its Player of the Century.

Hadl was an All-American quarterback in his senior year of 1961, and in the 1962 draft the Lions took him with the 10th overall pick.

The San Diego Chargers of the Foolish Club picked Hadl, too.

The Lions had a chasm the size of the Grand Canyon at quarterback throughout the 1960s. A rifle-armed guy like John Hadl would have looked very nice in a Honolulu Blue jersey.

But Hadl, like Johnny Robinson two years earlier, snubbed the Lions and signed with the Chargers, who were coached by pass-happy Sid Gillman.

John Hadl would play 16 years of pro football and throw for over 33,000 yards, almost 27,000 of those coming with Gillman and the Chargers.

How would the Lions’ fortunes have changed with Hadl as their QB?

In 1964, there was a towering, quick defensive end from the University of Buffalo named Gerry Philbin. At Buffalo, Philbin earned all sorts of honors, including Little All America.

The Lions selected Philbin in the third round of the 1964 draft.

But once again, the Foolish Club fouled things up.

Philbin was also drafted by the New York Jets, a team just a hop, skip and a jump from Philbin’s home town of Pawtucket, Rhode Island.

Philbin signed with the Jets, again leaving the Lions holding the bag.

Gerry Philbin became a member of the AFL’s All-Time Team and recorded 15 sacks for the 1968 Jets, winners of Super Bowl III.

And he did it all while not playing for the Lions.

The Lions kept drafting well but signing poorly.

It happened to them again the year after drafting Philbin.

Fred Biletnikoff was a sure-handed receiver out of Florida State—the school’s first consensus All-American.

The Lions could have used a playmaking receiver in 1965, with their plodding offense, led by unspectacular quarterbacks not named John Hadl.

Inspired by Biletnikoff’s college greatness at catching passes, the Lions selected him in the third round of the 1965 draft.

So did the Oakland Raiders of the AFL.

Naturally, Biletnikoff spurned the Lions and signed with Al Davis and the Raiders.

They named an award for Biletnikoff in 1994. It goes to the best receiver in college football. Biletnikoff was enshrined into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1988 after a stellar, 14-year career with the Raiders.

What might the Lions have been in the 1960s and ‘70s, if Johnny Robinson, John Hadl, Gerry Philbin and Fred Biletnikoff hadn’t spurned them?

The Lions crapped out on all four of these AFL stars. Their stingy ways scared them all off. The house won.

It’s all ancient history now, but isn’t it the unalienable right of the Lions fan to ask “What if?”

 

Advertisements